Audobon Condor Event

DAY OF THE CONDOR: IS IT HERE?
THURSDAY – APRIL 9TH; 7:00 PM
FORD ROOM, DOUGLAS COUNTY LIBRARY, 1409 NE DIAMOND LAKE BLVD., ROSEBURG
SUSAN HAIG, SENIOR SCIENTIST, U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

The California Condor was last seen in Oregon in the early 1900s. Following that, the species underwent a precipitous decline that left some thinking their numbers would never recover. An intense captive breeding effort saved them from extinction and the current wild population of condors is deftly managed by zoos and wildlife biologists in the western U.S. This intense hands-on handling is due to the birds needing to be chelated at least once a year to remove lead from their bodies. Most often this lead has come from lead bullets used in hunting and is impossible to completely remove from the carcass they consume as food. A Blue Ribbon Panel commissioned by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the California Audubon Society concluded that lead must be greatly reduced in order for the birds to survive a reintroduction to Oregon. The talk by Susan Haig will cover these topics and efforts to bring the birds back to Oregon in the next few years.

Susan Haig is a Senior Scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey in Corvallis, OR; a Professor of Wildlife Ecology at Oregon State University and a Research Associate of the Smithsonian Institution. She and her students and postdocs work on issues related to recovery of endangered birds, including California Condors, as well as recovery of Great Basin wetlands. She just finished a term as President of the American Ornithologists’ Union, the oldest and largest professional ornithological society in the western hemisphere.

This event is free and open to the public.
Questions or comments? E-mail us at info@umpquaaudubon.org.

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